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The 10 Best DAW Apps in the World Today


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The 10 best DAW apps for creating music


Now that you know what to look for in a DAW, let’s check out at the best recording software.

Here’s the essential list of the 10 best DAWs currently available.

1. Bitwig


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Bitwig studio was launched in 2014 by a group of former Ableton developers after an extensive testing period.

Bitwig draws some inspiration from Ableton, but it has pioneered its own creative workflows and composition approaches.

Unique modulation options, strong hardware integration, and songwriting-friendly tools make Bitwig a solid option for any creator.

Bitwig is easy to learn if you’re just starting out with recording software and gives you plenty of room to grow.

2. Studio One 4.5

Studio One is Presonus’ entry into the DAW scene.

It’s newer than other DAWs but really coming into its own with Version 4.5. Studio One 4.5 boasts some uniquely powerful tools you won’t find anywhere else.

It’s proprietary high resolution internal MIDI protocol allows for smoother parameter changes in MIDI parts.

And the dedicated hardware interfacing plugin lets you use outboard gear easier than ever before.

The workflow in Studio One 4.5 is focused on creativity and inspiration.

The workflow in Studio One 4.5 is focused on creativity and inspiration.

Its “songwriting first” design makes it easy to compose fast—you can even output printable scores and lead sheets from the parts you create in the DAW.

Studio One 4.5 may seem like a bit of an underdog, but that gives it a lot of space to innovate and the results are impressive.

3. Ableton Live 10

Ableton Live is one of the biggest players in the DAW scene for good reason.

Its inspiring workflow and intuitive “session view” has made it a favourite among electronic producers.

Ableton’s built-in sampling and synthesis plugins are extremely high quality sound-design tools.

Ableton’s built-in sampling and synthesis plugins are extremely high quality sound-design tools.

Its composition workflow is among the easiest and best for getting results fast. The session view even allows you to jam your arrangements live by trigger clips and loops in different combinations.

If that weren’t enough, Ableton continues to release excellent sample packs to their huge library of content you can use in your tracks.

Since acquiring digital audio legend Cycling ‘74 in 2017, Ableton has offered the insanely flexible Max digital signal processing environment with Live as Max4Live.

This makes Live the most versatile sound design tool out there—there’s a lot to love!

4. Audacity

Audacity was released in 2009 as a completely free recording software. And it’s still free today!

Audacity is compatible with all operating systems and easy to download right away.

Audacity is compatible with all operating systems and easy to download right away.

It has everything you need to record audio on a timeline with no extra features.

It doesn’t record MIDI, so using virtual instruments like VST synths is out of the question—and plugin effects have to be applied destructively offline.

That means that Audacity might not be the best choice for a full mix.

But if you’re just getting started with the core ideas of digital recording, Audacity might be the perfect way to jump in.

5. Pro Tools 2019

Pro Tools is the industry standard DAW. This is the one you’ll find in almost every professional studio.

Pro Tools was designed for traditional recording in a studio setting and it excels at every part of that process.

Pro Tools was designed for traditional recording in a studio setting and it excels at every aspect of that process.

Professional engineers love it for the speed of editing and the high quality mixing environment.

It may have a slightly steeper learning curve than other DAWs, but it’s worth putting in the time if you ever hope to work in a professional studio.

Pro Tools comes in several configurations including the free, introductory edition Pro Tools First which is limited to 16 tracks.

The premium, hardware accelerated edition is now called Pro Tools Ultimate and the standard native version is simply called “Pro Tools.”

Like other paid software, Pro Tools is transitioning to a hybrid subscription/license model with each subsequent edition named after the year of release (we’re currently on Pro Tools 2019).

Pro Tools also requires you to use the iLok hardware DRM platform, which may be off putting to some users.

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